Current Weather Outlook

Statewide weather outlook from Florida Division of Emergency Management Meteorology
 

Tuesday, September 28, 2021

...Sunny and Mostly Dry Across the Entire State Today...Isolated Showers Still Possible in the Florida Keys and the Panhandle...Several Rivers Across the State Remain in Flood Stage...Rip Current Risk Remains Elevated at Atlantic Beaches...The Tropics are Active but No Threats to Florida Over the Next 5-7 Days...

Updated at 9:06 AM EDT

Today's Threats:

No Threat Low Threat Medium Threat High Threat
Lightning Tornado Damaging Wind/Hail Fog Flash Flooding Excessive Heat River Flooding Rip Currents

 

          Northeast FL & Peninsula

Panhandle & East Coast

 West Coast

 

Weather Summary for the Next 24 Hours:   

High pressure remains in place across the Sunshine State. Skies will be sunny today with only some isolated showers across the Florida Keys and the Panhandle. Winds will be breezy at times in South Florida, with some gusts to 25 mph.

Temperatures will be seasonal with highs forecast to be in the middle to upper 80s. Humidity is gradually returning to the state, so the heat index will be in the 90s this afternoon. Tonight, low temperatures will fall into the 60s across inland areas of North & Central Florida with the rest of the state reaching the lower to middle 70s. The exception will be coastal southeast Florida and the Keys where lows will be in the upper 70s to lower 80s.

 

 

The tropics remain active as we are in the peak of hurricane season. However, there are no threats to Florida at this time.

Major Hurricane Sam: As of 5am EDT, the center of Sam was located about 600 miles east of the northern Leeward Islands and is moving northwest at 9 mph. Sam is currently a category 4 hurricane with maximum sustained winds at 130 mph. Some fluctuations in intensity are anticipated, but Sam should remain a major hurricane for the next few days. Sam will turn northward later in the week and near Bermuda this weekend. This system poses no threat to Florida, but large swells from the system will increase the rip current risk at Atlantic beaches this weekend and into next week.

Monitoring for development...

1. Central Tropical Wave (Invest 91L): Disorganized showers and thunderstorms are associated with a broad area of low pressure located several hundred miles southwest of the Cabo Verde Islands. Environmental conditions are forecast to be conducive for further development of this disturbance, and a tropical depression is likely to form in a few days while it moves westward to west-northwestward at 5 to 10 mph over the central tropical Atlantic. NHC gives this system a 70% (high) chance of development over the next 48 hours, but an 80% (high) chance of development over the next 5 days. This is no threat to Florida this week but should be monitored.

2. West Africa Tropical Wave (Invest 90L): A tropical wave is just offshore the west coast of Africa and. Upper-level winds are forecast to be conducive for gradual development, and a tropical depression is likely to form in a few days while the system moves westward to west-northwestward at 10 to 15 mph over the far eastern tropical Atlantic. NHC gives this system a 80% (high) chance of development over the next 48 hours, but an 90% (high) chance of development over the next 5 days. This is no threat to Florida this week.

 

3. Remnants of Peter: An elongated area of low pressure associated with the remnants of Peter is located a few hundred miles east of Bermuda. Environmental conditions are marginally conducive for some further development, and Peter could briefly become a tropical depression again during the next day or two while it moves northeastward near 10 mph. NHC gives this system a 50% (medium) chance of development over the next 24 hours before it moves into a hostile environment. This system poses no threat to Florida.

The next names on the list are Victor and Wanda.

For the latest on the tropics, please visit the National Hurricane Center at www.hurricanes.gov.

 

Flash Flooding: There is no threat of Flash Flooding today.

Hydrology: A River Flood Warning remains in effect until further notice for the Santa Fe River, Cypress Creek, the Myakka River, and the St. Johns River at Astor where minor flooding is ongoing and rivers will be slow to fall. Hampton LakeFisheating Creek near Lakeport, and the Ocklawaha River at Rodman Dam are also in flood stage. Elsewhere across the state, many rivers remain in action stage/bank-full but are generally falling. For more details on specific river levels, please visit the River Forecast Center.

Lake Okeechobee’s average elevation is 15.47 feet, which is within the operational band but 0.67 feet above normal for this time of year.

 

Rip Currents: Onshore winds and persistent swells will result in a moderate risk of rip currents at Atlantic beaches today. A moderate risk of rip currents will continue for some eastern Panhandle beaches as well. A low risk of rip currents can be expected elsewhere. Wave heights will be 1-3’ statewide. For the latest Rip Current Outlook, visit www.weather.gov/beach.

 

Marine Hazards: A patchy bloom of Red Tide continues along the West Coast with a new bloom detected in the Panhandle. Moderate to high concentrations have been observed along the coast from southern Pasco to Charlotte. There are no reports from in Tampa Bay. Moderate to low concentrations have been observed at Okaloosa and Walton County beaches near and around Choctawhatchee Bay. Respiratory irritation and fish kills continue to be reported at local beaches.

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